La doce uvas de la suerte “The twelve grapes of luck” New Year’s tradition.

English: Grapes in tender stage

“12 uvas de la suerte”  (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Spain and other Hispanic countries follow the tradition of eating 12 grapes at the stroke of twelve, to celebrate the new year. This is a good omen, often making a wish, or several, hoping they may come true.

This tradition dates back to the 1800’s. This tradition came to be in Alicante, Spain. Vine growers started to sell and promote grapes in December from their good and plentiful harvests.  The custom stuck!

How to’s:

On December 31’st, place twelve grapes on a small plate (thank God for the seedless grapes!), and when the clock begins the countdown to 12, you must eat a grape upon every stoke of the bell. You must have eaten them all by the last chime. No easy feat. Try to have small grapes and not look at your friends or family while you are at it, or you will burst into laughter and at worst choke! It’s like a race.

Try it! If not for the good luck, just for laughs! It’s fun!

What traditions do you follow on New Year’s Eve?

About Casa Hispana

Casa Hispana brings the study of Spanish to life. Since 1985, we have provided a warm atmosphere where our instructors foster students to confidently absorb and apply the language. Casa Hispana teaches only Spanish. All of our instructors are native speakers with backgrounds in Education. Their skills and experience, along with our method, make it easier for you to learn in a fully Spanish atmosphere, and to express yourself with ease and confidence from the very first day.
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One Response to La doce uvas de la suerte “The twelve grapes of luck” New Year’s tradition.

  1. Pingback: Lentils to start 2013 on the right foot! | Casa Hispana

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